SIDEBAR
»
S
I
D
E
B
A
R
«
Dialogue Intensive – The art of putting words into your characters’ mouths

JoshMohr

Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. San Francisco
$95 members/$110 others  (this class is not currently scheduled)

How many times have we heard the aged expression, “We’ll see what she says about that!”There’s anticipation in hearing someone express themselves, and the same is true of fiction and creative nonfiction (personal essays, memoirs): our characters need to speak, voice their opinions, woes, aspirations, biases, phobias, regrets.“We can write lovely exposition,” says instructor Joshua Mohr, “but readers need to hear what our characters sound like, what their preoccupations are.That way they can sculpt their own conclusions about them.”

Read the rest of this entry »

Crafting Childhood in Fiction and Memoir

mcclungnew22

This Class is Not Being Offered Next Session

Saturday, NO DATE AT THIS TIME, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
$95 members/$110 others

[add_to_cart=41]

Writing truthfully and artfully about our early childhood—before age 12—calls for a fine balance of skill and compassion, memory and imagination.  This mini-workshop, designed for both beginning and experienced writers, will provide practice and guidance to illuminate and enrich creative projects exploring the events, people, places, and inner worlds of childhood.

“My goal is to help memoirists, fiction writers, and poets write faithfully and evocatively about the girls and boys that they — or their fictional characters — once were,” says instructor Kathleen McClung. Read the rest of this entry »

Want to Sell Your Book? Write a Fabulous Book Proposal

dianne-jacobheadshot20081Five Weeks, 7-9:30 p.m  Berkeley
$185 members/$215 non-members
(this class is not currently scheduled)

Have you started working on a nonfiction book or memoir (or already completed one?). Have you written your book proposal yet? If not, you’re going to need one. Typically, a proposal is written before the book, but if you’ve already written the book, you’ll still need one. The proposal is the document you send to literary agents and/or editors. It’s essentially a sales pitch, making a case for why the book needs to be written, why now, and why you’re the best person for the job.

Read the rest of this entry »

Dialogue Intensive – The art of putting words into someone else’s mouth

JoshMohr

This class is not being offered next session.

Five Saturdays, NO DATE AT THIS TIME, San Francisco
$185 members/$215 others

[add_to_cart=24]

How many times have we heard the aged expression, “We’ll see what she says about that!” There’s anticipation in hearing someone express themselves, and the same is true of fiction and creative nonfiction writing: our characters need to speak, voice their opinions, woes, aspirations, biases, phobias, regrets.  “We can write lovely exposition,” says instructor Joshua Mohr, “but readers need to hear what our characters sound like, what their preoccupations are. That way they can sculpt their own conclusions about them.” Read the rest of this entry »

Poetry and Surprise

BruckCroppedOne Saturday, 10 a.m.-1 p.m.  San Francisco
$55 members/$65 non-members
(this class is not currently scheduled)

“When U.S. Poet Laureate Kay Ryan decided to take up poetry,” says instructor Julie Bruck, “she began by picking tarot cards at random, writing a poem to each until she’d exhausted the deck. This, she said, was a way for her to discover her themes. By her own account, her process hasn’t changed much, but there’s a thrill that goes into unwrapping her short, highly-compressed poems that is a direct transmission of the play that goes into their making.

Read the rest of this entry »

Self-Publishing Your Book – How to navigate the road to success

lisaalpinesmaller

One Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.   San Francisco
$95 members/$110 non-members
(this class is not currently scheduled)

“Once you’ve written your book, who will deliver it to the readers?” says instructor Lisa Alpine. “Do you trust a publishing house to invest money in these financially strapped times to promote your book? Or do you jump on the self-publishing bandwagon and get it out there yourself – NOW? But if you opt for the latter, who then will design, market and distribute your book?”

Lisa will guide you over the tough terrain of getting your book birthed and onto the bookstore shelves. She will lay out the map of your many options, covering these points and more:

Read the rest of this entry »

Screenwriters Roundtable – You’re not alone!

Terrel Seltzer Friday, Feb. 26th, 7-10 p.m.   Berkeleyregister_off-70x18
$35 members/$45 non-members

“Are you working on a screenplay?  I know from experience what a lonely, confusing endeavor that can be,” says Terrel Seltzer. “So come have a good time talking it over with others who have chosen the same boat, rowing up that turbulent stream.  Bring a synopsis of your script, an outline, a treatment, a scene, a premise, an idea you want to try out.  Plus all your questions:  Read the rest of this entry »

Jenny Pritchett: Personal Essays – Tell Your Real-Life Stories

Five Saturdays, May 14 – June 18, 10:30am-1pm   Berkeley
Skip May 28
$215 members/$245 others  
Cancellation Policy
Testimonials for Jenny

Have you always wanted to write about your crazy family? What about an accident that changed the course of your life? A discovery that changed your perception of the past? A mysterious neighbor whose comings and goings excite your imagination? If you know you want to, but you don’t know where to start, this is your class. “By the end,” says Jenny, “you’ll walk away with a rough draft of a personal essay.

Read the rest of this entry »

Flash Fiction – When Less is More!

JoshMohrOne Saturday, 10 a.m-4  p.m.  San Francisco
$95 members/$110 others (this class is not currently scheduled)

“No iron can pierce the heart with such force as a period put just at the right place.”Isaac Babel

Flash fiction is an exciting and nuanced genre full of opportunities and surprises.  The stories, though diminutive in length, must still contain all the elements of narrative construction.  How does a writer compress plot and characterization into a few hundred words?  Is it possible to elicit an emotional response in a reader in merely two or three pages?

“Every writer should be concerned about economy, should deliberate over word choice,” says instructor Josh Mohr.  “Whether a short story writer or novelist, we should be scrutinizing every clause, making sure each syllable earns its space.  In a sense, flash is the perfect genre to hone revision techniques.

Read the rest of this entry »

Food Writing for Food Lovers

dianne-jacobheadshot2008Five Wednesdays, March 3-31, 7-9:30 pm    Berkeley
$185 members/ $215 non-members

[add_to_cart=70]

“As a food writer, I never get bored,” says instructor Dianne Jacob. “I’ve interviewed nationally-known cookbook authors, ghost-written a chapter about urban farming, written an essay about a food bank, detailed a French bed-and-breakfast run by an accomplished chef, and reviewed restaurants in San Francisco and on Bali. I’ve also written practical pieces about what to do with tuna besides make a sandwich. As a co-author, I collaborated with a chef on a book on grilled pizza. Once I discovered how much fun food writing was AND that I could get paid to eat and cook, I never looked back.”

Read the rest of this entry »

Revision Play Day

jane502Sunday, March 7th, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.     San Francisco
$95 members/$110 non-members  register_off-70x18

“Writing a rough first draft often feels more like play than work,” says Jane Underwood. “The words flow or even burst out, and you can be swept up in the thrill of simply getting something, anything down onto paper.

“Revision, on the other hand, tends to come in fits and starts, and to many beginners (or even pros!) feels more like work than play. But if you want to be a serious writer, you’ve got to rise to the revision challenge. You must go back and add more. Or, conversely, go back and subtract. You also have to think about things like order and structure and, god forbid, what you’re really trying to say. The list goes on. Your revision options are so numerous they can be downright daunting. But guess what: it doesn’t have to be that way. Revision can be pleasurable, exciting, and even fun. Yep, fun.

Read the rest of this entry »

»  Substance:WordPress   »  Style:Ahren Ahimsa
© Copyright 2013